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The Doc Swap – Transitioning from a Pediatric to Adult Doctor

Today was my official first day with an adult gastroenterologist. Until now, I had been seeing my pediatric gastroenterologist at my local children’s hospital. They had agreed to see me through my college years, which was great! But now, my pediatric days, just like my college ones, are over.

So, when I first started looking for a doctor a few months ago, I did the most logical thing: asked Google. I searched for gastroenterologist in my area and called the first one on the list. I scheduled an appointment and BAM. I was adult-ing, right?

WRONG. Ugh

First thing. I MISSED THE APPOINTMENT. I called to confirm my appointment on (what I thought was) the day of, only to find out it was 10 days ago. Struggle number one.

Struggle number two came at the reception desk. As a new patient, I knew I would have forms to fill out. But I didn’t realize I would have to fill them out verbally. Since I still use my parents’ insurance, the receptionist asked me for my parents’ work addresses, social security numbers – all things I didn’t know. I ended up looking like a fool, calling my mom halfway through to answer the questions.

So much for adult-ing.

I was finally ushered back to meet my new doctor. He was very nice, knowledgable and asked questions to get to know me and my disease better. What would have been helpful was if I had been up-to-date on my own medical records. He ended up reminding me of some of the tests and treatments I’ve been on over the years. This experience, my last struggle, reminded me how much I have to take on if I really want to handle this disease as a adult.

When you live with Crohn’s, it’s better to dwell on the times you feel good, not miserable. But I’m learning that keeping track for your appointments, diet and even how you feel on a daily basis is so important to living, a better, happier life with Crohn’s.

 

 

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